Theodore Roosevelt
Letters From a
Young Coal Miner.

Tobias, the Quig and the Rumplenut Tree
“The playful text and fanciful art make this book appealing.” -School Library Journal, October 2000

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Chicken Chuck
Written by Bill Martin Jr
Illustrated by Steven Salerno


Library Talk, starred review, 11/1/2000
“In this reillustrated version of a book first published in 1946, Chicken Chuck lives a normal life in a normal barnyard until he finds a special blue seed. When he eats it, the large, shiny blue feather that sprouts on his head causes envy among the other animals and vanity in Chicken Chuck. . . . Salerno's illustrations in this revised version will fascinate students. The iridescent cover and shining highlights throughout will draw them into the engaging text. Young readers are sure to notice that the horse's blue feathers lack the iridescent streak of Chicken Chuck's original feather.”


The New York Times Book Review, 6/1/2000
"A morality tale. Chicken Chuck ate a blue seed and grew a blue feather that he thought entitled him to be bossy. But a circus horse has two blue feathers . . . Funny."


School Library Journal, 6/1/2000
"Chicken Chuck ingests a blue seed that causes a glittery blue feather to sprout from his forehead. The other barnyard animals want one, too. . . . [At the circus] a monkey bestows upon Chuck and his friends special tie-on blue feathers. The barnyard becomes ‘a mass of bobbing feathers,' with Chicken Chuck asserting his individuality by wearing two. . . . This is a good read-aloud for children who can appreciate a longer story and who can discuss being different. . . . The hologramlike cover, with its silver, foil-like background, beckons youngsters. The blue feather is decorated with silver filigree, a leitmotiv repeated onto the endpapers. The retro-looking mixed-media illustrations are reminiscent of fanciful 1950s designs. The same page may include dazzling color images along with soft-black charcoal outlines. The former highlight the plot action while the latter accent the pastoral setting. Every page is a whimsical visual treat."



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